16 Days of Activism 2020

16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence is an international campaign to challenge violence against women and girls. The campaign runs every year from 25 November, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, to 10 December, Human Rights Day.

For 16 Days of Activism 2020, DefendDefenders collaborated with AfricanDefenders, Encrypt Uganda, Women of Uganda Network, Digital Literacy Initiative, and Digital Human Rights Lab. For 16 days, we shared stories of victims of online gender-based violence (GBV) on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram under the hashtag #SayNoToOnlineGBV. On the final day, we shared interviews with Women Human Rights Defenders fighting online GBV (see campaign contents below).

In a policy paper, written in the context of this campaign, we assessed women’s safety in the digital space in Uganda and made recommendations to the Ugandan government, to international actors, and to civil society.

We ended our campaign on 10 December, Human Rights Day, with a digital safety workshop for victims of online GBV in Kampala, Uganda, to increase the offline impact of the campaign.

Online campaign

Interviews with stakeholders

Non-consensual intimate images

Cyber bullying

Online sexual harassment

Doxing

Cyber stalking

Impersonation

MORE NEWS:

Human Rights Defender of the month: Kasale Maleton Mwaana

Kasale’s human rights activism precedes his years. The son of pastoralist parents from Ngorongoro district in northern Tanzania, he grew up seeing his parents and entire community having to defend their land and way of life against authorities who thought their lands could be put to better use. Now, at 25, Kasale is already one of the most recognizable advocates of his people’s cause, much to the ire of Tanzanian authorities.
“Our people’s struggle goes back many generations. It started with the pushing out of our forefathers from Serengeti to gazette Serengeti National Park in 1959, and then further evictions from the Ngorongoro crater to gazette the Ngorongoro conservation area in 1975. Since then, every generation has had to resist further evictions. It’s now my generation’s turn,” he says.

SHARE WITH FRIENDS: