Call for applications: Creative Film Residency

The East and Horn of Africa Human Rights Defenders Project (EHAHRDP) is seeking applicants for a Creative Film Residency position in Kampala, Uganda. The Resident will provide creative and hands-on direction in efforts to produce film, photographic, and written media exploring the stories of human rights defenders in East Africa and the Horn of Africa.

The ideal candidate will be a graduate of film school and/or have experience in producing narrative documentaries.The candidate should have general knowledge of the entire process or documentary planning, filming, and editing, though not necessarily full expertise at all stages of production. Experience with DSLR cameras in filmmaking is a strong advantage, as well as skill in other aspects of design and writing.

The Residency is an opportunity to work with a dynamic team engaged in human rights issues in a turbulent region and to provide creative direction to a multimedia project.

We are willing to receive group/collective proposals where groups are already living in Kampala.

The Residency will include regional travel thus a valid travel document is necessary.All costs of the Residency will be provided for along with a modest Resident’s stipend. Duration of Residency will be determined in discussion with the successful applicant.

To apply please send a cover letter and CV along with any portfolio works to [email protected]. Application deadline is Thursday January 29th, 2015 at 5pm East African Time.

MORE NEWS:

Human Rights Defender of the month: Kasale Maleton Mwaana

Kasale’s human rights activism precedes his years. The son of pastoralist parents from Ngorongoro district in northern Tanzania, he grew up seeing his parents and entire community having to defend their land and way of life against authorities who thought their lands could be put to better use. Now, at 25, Kasale is already one of the most recognizable advocates of his people’s cause, much to the ire of Tanzanian authorities.
“Our people’s struggle goes back many generations. It started with the pushing out of our forefathers from Serengeti to gazette Serengeti National Park in 1959, and then further evictions from the Ngorongoro crater to gazette the Ngorongoro conservation area in 1975. Since then, every generation has had to resist further evictions. It’s now my generation’s turn,” he says.

SHARE WITH FRIENDS: