Introduction to Ttaala Program

Ttaala is a comprehensive skill building project for human rights defenders (HRDs) illuminating the world of digital tools and strategies. We aim to equip civil society organisations with technical and strategic skills for the effective defense of human rights in the digital age. Human Rights Defenders within the East and Horn of Africa face many challenges  including limited technical skills. 

Ttaala’s three-pronged project model focusses on: learning cohorts, our innovation incubator, and on public outreach. 

The learning cohorts are targeted at human rights organisations with a  little to intermediary digital  competence Selected participants receive 3-step training on various technical skills, mostly focused on data and advocacy building. Between sessions, Ttaala visits the participant organisations to follow-up on their progress and specific needs. 

The innovation incubator is aimed at previous participants of our learning cohorts or organisations with a higher skill level. Participants engage in a fast-paced workshop, where they develop an organisational project, such as databases or advocacy campaigns, with the help of consultants. We focus on no more than two organisations at a time, to maximise the impact of the innovation incubator. 

In the third prong – public outreach – we aim to engage all previous and current participating organisations by carrying out unifying activities and events. Through networking, they can share their skills and experiences. 

We aim to create a Ttaala community that includes past and present participants, creatives, and programme partners – animated by DefendDefenders to facilitate networking between organisations within the region and foster growth and  innovation through learning from each other. 

MORE NEWS:

Human Rights Defender of the month: Alex Njenga John

Alex Njenga has always believed in egalitarianism both as a principle and as a tool for justice. As a result, he has always been suspicious of, and at times hostile to social prejudices that treat some people as “more equal than others,” – to use a line from George Orwell’s famed political fable, Animal Farm.

Some of the experiences that have shaped his social and political outlook have been personal. As an adolescent in Kenya’s Uasin Gishu County, Alex was stigmatised and denied healthcare after he identified himself as belonging to Kenya’s sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) community.

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