Launch Of EHAHRDP’s External Evaluation Report On 25th November 2011

Between March and May 2011, a team of independent evaluators reviewed the work of the East and Horn of Africa Human Rights Defenders Project (EHAHRDP) since its formation and establishment in 2005. The main objective of this evaluation was to capture the impact and lessons learnt from EHAHRDP’s work.
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The evaluation report provides an assessment of the outcomes and impact that EHAHRDP has both contributed to and, where possible, can reasonably claim attribution, as well as offering evidence-based recommendations.
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For over 5 years, EHAHRDP has benefited significantly from committed support of its partners and donors and would therefore like to share with you the outcomes of the report. Some of the recommendations to come out of the evaluation are already being implemented and we would like to call on your support towards acheiving full implementation of the recommendations.
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A summary of the evaluation report can be downloaded here and the full report may be obtained by contacting the EHAHRDP secretariat at [email protected]

MORE NEWS:

Human Rights Defender of the month: Esther Tawiah

In Ghana, Esther Tawiah is one of the loudest voices for women empowerment and gender. It is also why she is one of the most loathed. Born and raised in New-Tafo in the country’s eastern region, Esther grew up surrounded by a culture that frowned at the idea of women participating in public affairs, and witnessed firsthand, the backlash those who dared to challenge that cultural norm faced.

“I grew up in a society where ageism and sexism were so entrenched. As a young person, you weren’t supposed to give your opinion on public issues, especially if you were a woman. Women who dared to speak up were caricatured and branded as frustrated, unmarriageable prostitutes, all designed to shut them up,” she says.

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