Sudan: ensuring a credible response by the UN Human Rights Council

Ahead of the 42nd regular session of the UN Human Rights Council (HRC42), Sudanese, regional and international civil society organisations urge the Council to address serious human rights violations and abuses in Sudan and support systemic reforms in the country.

In a letter published today, DefendDefenders and partners call on the Council to formulate a holistic response to the situation in the country, including by ensuring an investigation of violations committed since December 2018; renewing the mandate of the UN Independent Expert on Sudan; and strengthening monitoring and reporting by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).

The signatories write: “Silence is no longer an option.
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The transitional agreement is no guarantee of improved respect for human rights.
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As the UN’s top human rights body, the Council should fulfill its responsibilities towards the Sudanese people and contribute to ensuring that human rights compliance and systemic reforms are central parts of a sustainable political solution to the crisis and that peaceful transitional arrangements are respected, in line with its mandate to promote and protect human rights.”

We call on Member and Observer States of the Council to work towards the adoption of a resolution using the range of tools available to address Sudan’s short-, mid-, and long-term human rights challenges. A summary of major human rights developments in Sudan since December 2018 is included in the annex to the letter.

Read the full letter.

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Aside from the fact that the expenditure was unnecessary – both the Speaker and her Deputy already have two luxury vehicles for their official duties, the purchase flouted all public procurement procedures, and when Parliament’s contracts committee could not approve the procurement, the members of the committee were fired and new ones immediately appointed to approve the purchase.

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