Eritrea: maintain Human Rights Council scrutiny and engagement

In a letter released today, DefendDefenders and partners call on the UN Human Rights Council to extend the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on Eritrea. Ahead of the 44th session of the Coun­cil (scheduled to begin in June 2020), the signatories urge State delegations to support the adop­­tion of a resolution extending the Special Rappor­teur’s mandate for a further year.

The group of non-governmental orga­ni­sations recall that Eritrea’s domestic human rights situation remains dire and no concrete evidence of pro­gress can be reported. Despite Eritrea’s obligations, as a Council member, to “uphold the highest stan­d­ards in the promotion and protection of human rights” and to “fully cooperate with the Council,” the government refuses to cooperate with the Special Rapporteur.

In their joint letter, the signatories write: “The Council should urge Eritrea to make progress towards meet­ing its membership obligations and to engage with the UN human rights system constructively. It should not reward non-cooperation by, but rather maintain scrutiny of, one of its members.”

Read the full letter.

MORE NEWS:

Human Rights Defender of the Month: Anny Kapenga

As a young student, Anny Kapenga used to cringe at the cult-like worship of Mobutu Sese Seko, the then Zaire’s President. By then, in the early 1990s, Zaire was still under one party rule, and calls were increasing for Mobutu to open political space to allow other parties to operate. In the meantime, however, all Zairians were expected to show affection for Mobutu wherever they gathered in public.

Students across Zaire’s schools were required to sing and dance adoringly before his (Mobutu)’s portrait every morning before they went to class, and all school scholastic materials were emblemed with his portrait. A young Anny never really appreciated the obsession:

SHARE WITH FRIENDS:

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on email